ALZHEIMER’S STORIES

Alzheimer’s is now the third leading cause of death in the United States. Over 40 MILLION people worldwide have Alzheimer’s or dementia and over 5 MILLION Americans are living with Alzheimer’s. Make no mistake, this disease is the epidemic of the 21st Century.

Alzheimer’s takes a devastating toll on families and the financial impact on our economy will be unlike anything we’ve ever seen, if we don’t find a cure. Bottom line – this disease affects everyone. On this page, you can watch videos from Alzheimer’s patients, their families, advocates, and policy makers. To locate the Alzheimer’s stories relevant to you, please use the search feature, in the upper right corner of this page, to start watching and learning.

Every person you see in these videos, has participated in this project because they understand the stakes are high and we must ALL help shatter the stigma. More awareness means more money for research and a cure. If you’re moved by these stories, please share them with your local, Alzheimer’s communities.

September 6, 2016

I Tell People the Truth about Alzheimer’s

(6/16) You know, it’s hard. I have a lot of people say to me, “my mother was just diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, my hairdresser’s sister’s uncle was just diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, can you talk to them? You know, because you know so much about it.” And I’m always happy to do that and I always wish that I had, like super words of wisdom, to give them a pat on the back and just say, “it’s going to be ok”. The truth is, Alzheimer’s is a death sentence, so by the time someone gets an Alzheimer’s diagnosis, the doctor is basically saying, you’re going to die, in a relatively short amount of time, from this horrible disease that is going to shut down your body and your brain. And make you, you know, a glimmer of who you used to be. That’s kind of the first thing I say to them, is that it’s going to be difficult. And people might say, it’s not that bad, but it really is, you know? It’s a long, slow loss of life. There are moments of joy and we try to find those and we try to hold onto those. You know, the time that the person can remember you or they can make that connection. Alzheimer’s, while it’s a horrible disease, it’s a great reminder to live in the present and to live as fully, everyday, as we possibly can. Because people with Alzheimer’s, they don’t have a recollection of the past and they don’t have a concept of the future, so they are in the present, all the time. They’re living in the present and that’s where you’re able to connect with them. That’s where they’re able to connect with you. So, if you can stay there, as much as possible, that’s the greatest gift they can give to you. Carrie Jackson lost her Father to Alzheimer’s disease. She is now a relentless advocate in the Chicago area and works tirelessly, to help raise awareness and funding for research.
September 3, 2016

Father Knows Best

(3/16) He never actually said the words, but there’s two things that I, when I think of my dad, I think of and one is that he always made people feel they were the most important person in the room. So, any time he was with someone, he gave them his undivided attention and he made that person feel really special. That always had an impact on me, cause I saw how, a 30 second interaction with someone could really make their day. And how he really made people feel important and valued. The other thing that he was really good at, was he was friends with the janitors, he was friends with the bartenders, he was friends with, maybe not the owner of the establishment, but he knew how to get a free drink if he needed to. He made friends with the “little people” and that had bigger dividends and bigger feedback, at the end.    Carrie Jackson lost her Father to Alzheimer’s disease. She is now a relentless advocate in the Chicago area and works tirelessly, to help raise awareness and funding for research.
September 2, 2016

Daddy’s Little Girl – An Alzheimer’s Story

(2/16) My dad was 55 when I was born. He retired when I was eight, so he was a stay-at-home dad at that time and I’m not sure he really wanted to be a stay-at-home dad. I think he kind of, would rather have continued on in the business world for a little bit longer. But instead, he was schlepping us to gymnastics practices and making lunches and stuff like that. I was “Daddy’s Little Girl”, we had a very special relationship. He moved away when I was a teenager, when my parents divorced and then he moved back right before he started to get sick. So, we had a very special relationship, you know, because he was so much older. He was able to tell me about things that I really didn’t have a chance to learn or hear about and other things he told me about. I mean, he was in World War II. He was a hero. His plane went down in the Philippines and he rescued everyone, basically. There’s an article I have, from the New York Times about that. He told me about working at the New York World’s Fair, he told me about seeing Billie Holiday in concert, he told me about all of these things, you know, first hand, that I was kind of reading about in my history books in school. So, it was really interesting.  Carrie Jackson lost her Father to Alzheimer’s disease. She is now a relentless advocate in the Chicago area and works tirelessly, to help raise awareness and funding for research.  
September 1, 2016

Carrie: How Alzheimer’s Has Touched Me

(1/16) Well, I was in my early twenties, when my father was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. It was kind of a slow progression, at first. He showed some memory loss, he showed some general forgetfulness. But it was right after I graduated from college that he was officially diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. I was his primary caregiver for about eight years, until his death in 2012. Physically, emotionally, socially, intellectually, every single aspect of my life changed during those years. So, now I’ve become a big advocate and a spokesperson, kind of, for ending Alzheimer’s. Carrie Jackson lost her Father to Alzheimer’s disease. She is now a relentless advocate in the Chicago area and works tirelessly, to help raise awareness and funding for research.  
July 12, 2016

My Dad Has Dementia and I’m Only 16

My Father was diagnosed with Dementia eight years ago. I was 16 and my brother was 11. At the beginning, we didn’t know how this disease was going to affect him or affect us. But, until around about four years ago, when he didn’t remember my mother, my brother, or me…even his language became really unclear and he was not able to walk. Nayomi is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

What Would Happen If I Lose My Memories?

Memory is very important and it’s cruel to lose all your memories and identity. And it made me realize…someday, what if I lose all my memories and I wasn’t able to do anything? Just like my father. And it always worries me and that really inspired me to join this organization and help other people who are affected by Alzheimer’s. And since my father is not with me, I had to send him away to Sri Lanka four years ago, we were not able to take care of him here, since we were new immigrants and we were not able to get disability income or anything. So, I had to kind of step in and make a decision to send him away to Sri Lanka. And I still feel really…I don’t know how to say it, but…I really still feel, I should have done more to support him and do more research on what kind of programs, that helps low income, immigrant families. But at that time I didn’t have any choice. And I really had to make a choice and send him to Sri Lanka and have somebody take care of him there because the cost of living is much cheaper there. So, I definitely became more responsible since then; since my father was diagnosed. But sometimes I question my life: “what would happen if I lose all of my memories?” And it scares me sometimes. Nayomi is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

My Father Was 59 and Living with Dementia

I don’t see a particular age, that “oh, this age is older, or like after 60 or 70 is older…” Because my father was diagosed at 59, so he was pretty young, to be diagnosed with dementia. And my grandfather, he passed away at 93 and he lived long, at 93. He had a little bit of dementia, in like the last six months of his life. And what I learned from my experience, is always take care of your parents and grandparents. And when my mom was taking care of my grandfather, I did help her and realized that, someday we are going to be there too. We’re going to be old. And we want somebody to take care of us. It’s very important to like, not forget it old people and take care of them. And always remember, they’re the ones who raised us. And we’re here because of them. Nayomi is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

You Get Alzheimer’s When You’re Old…No. You Don’t.

I think, be aware that this kind of disease really exists. And, I think for most people, it’s hard to understand unless they have a family member who is really affected. But, I mean some people do understand. But, just spread the awareness and take this seriously. It’s not something that you get when you get old. I had a lot of people, all my friends telling me: “oh, you get Alzheimer’s when you get old, who cares?” And it shouldn’t be like that at all. People should care from a young age and take care of yourself. Nayomi is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

Why I Joined The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s

Yeah, so I actually, just recently got involved with the Youth Movement. The reason I wanted to get involved was because my grandmother has Alzheimer’s. She’s had it for quite awhile now. And it’s been something that’s been really difficult for me and my family. So I wanted to take a stand and do something to fight Alzheimer’s and actually make a difference. Kyle is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

Educate Yourself About Alzheimer’s

The thing that young people can do today is, just find out more about the disease. You know, learn what Alzheimer’s is and how it affects people. And what it’s impact on society is because it’s something that, you know, people don’t really understand. People know what cancer is and that’s a big thing that affects a lot of people. But Alzheimer’s isn’t something that gets that much publicity and it’s not something that people hear about that often. So, I think just educating yourself, finding out what it is, and then seeing how you can help and how you can make a difference. Kyle is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

How Education Keeps My Brain Healthy

What I’m doing, is obviously going to college. My grandmother didn’t have a lot of mental stimulation, I guess. She stopped working at a younger age. And she kind of didn’t have that mental stimulation, so I think just, you know, keeping my mind active and doing work, having a job and being successful and finding something that I really love to do, You know, a career that I really enjoy so that I can do it for a long time. Kyle is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
July 12, 2016

Alzheimer’s and the Presidential Election

I’m not one who enjoys politics, so I actually try to not follow what’s happening and then sort of do my own research, you know right before the election and kind of figure out who I want to vote for then. I really don’t enjoy the way our political system works, I think there are a lot of problems. But I think Alzheimer’s will have an effect on this election, you know after a candidate is elected because, you know, it’s not something that they’re talking about right now. But obviously with Obamacare and a lot of medical, healthcare reform in recent years, it’s going to be something that the candidates are going to have to deal with. Kyle is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Why I Avoid Sugar

We have an aging class this quarter and our professor is very anti-sugar. So, I’ve been trying to avoid that, because it may or may not lead to Alzheimer’s, but it’s probably good to avoid, overall. I think part of it too, is education and sticking through with reading the newspaper and doing other the stuff and just having new stuff to read, can also help your brain. Kate is a member of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Why I Joined The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s

I got involved through friends, who were involved with the organization and it’s a cause that I believe in, because I see it when i’m at work. I work at an emergency department, that’s very close to a couple of hospices. And every once in awhile, or more than every once in awhile, we see people who come in, who have dementia, that is from Alzheimer’s. It’s incredibly scary because sometimes they come in without a whole lot of information and we don’t know what their medication allergies are, we don’t know what medications they take on a daily basis. We just kind of see them as a chief complaint, abdominal pain; which is vague and they can’t tell us a whole lot more than that. So I see it as a problem because in 60 years that could be me and I’d want someone to be there for me, to tell them what was going on.   Kate is a member of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Alzheimer’s Awareness for People Under 30

I think there’s definitely a negative reaction because I think there’s a lot of fear associated with it. But I know if you don’t have family members or you don’t see it as often, it’s kind of easy to forget because it does take so long to affect you; maybe your parents, if they’re still in their early 50’s. In terms of awareness, I think that’s probably the most important thing, that people under 30 can do. Because there’s not a whole lot we can do now, once people have gotten Alzheimer’s or progressed into late stage Alzheimer’s. But we might be able to do something for us or our parents. Kate is a member of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

The Youth Movement Supports Undergrad Research

I mean, a cure is a long way off, but that’s clearly the main goal. Maybe different types of incentives for research in that area. It’s kind of hard getting funding for it because it’s kind of a mix-match of issues right now. It’s kind of a collection of symptoms. But probably research funding leading towards a cure, would be my biggest goal.   Kate is a member of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Goals for the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s

I think one of the biggest goals is reaching out to many more schools; colleges and high schools. And I think that the more word we get out, about our organization, the more people will learn about Alzheimer’s. And, maybe once people become researchers or something, maybe people will gain more interest in that and hopefully push for more reform and research in that field. Julian is the Regional Outreach Director for The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Millennial Advice for Alzheimer’s Advocates

So, the single most important thing that young people can do, in the fight against Alzheimer’s, I think you should just cherish the moments you have, with your grandparents or parents; while they still have those memories. I think that’s one of the most important things that I wish I gained from my Grandmother. Because I was little when she was diagnosed and I wish I heard more of her story, from her. Julian is the Regional Outreach Director for The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 30, 2016

Millennial POV on Aging

I could be doing more. I just got out of my class that’s about aging and it’s basically all about what we can do to stop unhealthy aging. So, I guess I should get more sleep and eat less sugar. Julian is the Regional Outreach Director for The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 22, 2016

Meet The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s

My Grandma has the disease. My Grandfather had Alzheimer’s disease. I started working on the public policy side. There was no over-arching national organization to bring young people together, to fight this disease. Our particular organization is different from other Alzheimer’s organizations. We have approached this disease from a variety of angles: fundraising, advocacy, and also research. And we have started a research campaign to funnel the brightest, young minds across the nation, into doing research, in the fields of neurodegenerative diseases, so that they can be the ones that, in 10 to 15 years, who knows; eventually curing the disease. With more research funding, with more inspired undergrads, and more career paths in this area, we can truly make an impact on this disease. In 10 years, we at the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, have a vision of having an Alzheimer’s related organization, on every single high school and college campus in America. We want to work to get Alzheimer’s part of the curriculum. We want people to know about the disease, from a younger age. And we want to create a general awareness. This is really important because I do believe, like any movement, there’s strength in numbers. And the more students, the more scholars we have that know about the disease, and that are researching this disease, the odds are pretty good that we’re going to find a cure. Nihal Satyadev and Jay Gopal, Co-Founders of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s at UCLA, talk about why they started the world’s first, Millennial-powered, Alzheimer’s organization.
June 22, 2016

Alzheimer’s: It’s a Universal Disease

You really can’t even begin to understand it, until you’ve been around it and you’ve seen it. It’s something that can happen to you, that’s watching this video. It’s something that can happen to your best friend. Alzheimer’s doesn’t just destroy minds, it destroys families. It destroys relationships, it destroys the very essence of what makes you human, really. And as we share these personal stories, I hope that you’re able to understand that Alzheimer’s is a universal disease, that affects everyone, either directly or indirectly. Nihal Satyadev and Jay Gopal, Co-Founders of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s at UCLA, talk about why it’s important to share stories about Alzheimer’s.
June 22, 2016

Important Message from The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s

Dear Congress Member… Name me one disease that has been adequately funded, that hasn’t found a cure. Polio, Cancer, HIV/AIDS – anything that we’ve put our funding towards and our brightest minds towards, we’ve found an answer. We are a network of scientific researchers and we can find the cure. Jay Gopal and Nihal Satyadev co-founded the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, to help high school and college students raise awareness and research money for Alzheimer’s.
June 22, 2016

Millennial-Powered Alzheimer’s Organization

We really want to rally the millennials to this cause because we feel like our strength lies in our numbers and our youthful passion that we bring to day to day life. There’s no incentive for people who join our organization. There’s no stipend, there’s no salary. There’s no celebrity promises. We rely purely on the millennial desire to make a national change, to make an impact on individual lives and to empower people, to share their personal stories. Jay Gopal and Nihal Satyadev co-founded the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, to help high school and college students raise awareness and research money for Alzheimer’s. This is the first organization of it’s kind.
June 22, 2016

Aging Is a Beautiful Thing

All around us, all the time, are these like really, video, media, television shows – everyone’s young and beautiful. And then you see aging and you’re kind of scared about it, like “I don’t want to age!” What’s going to happen? You’re going to get disease when you get old, you’re not going to be able to walk, you get wrinkly. There’s all this new medicine around not getting old. And I think it’s a natural part of life. And there are parts of it you shouldn’t need to be scared of. The technology we’re using right now to prevent aging, maybe we should redirect some of that focus and focus it on things like Alzheimer’s, what we’re scared of about aging. Aging is a beautiful thing, it’s not something we should be scared of. Nasim is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, to help high school and college students raise awareness and research money for Alzheimer’s.
June 22, 2016

Alzheimer’s: Not Just for Old People

There’s this whole belief that, unless it’s directly related to you, it’s not necessarily something that you care about. Like, it’s kind of a very selfish belief, but Alzheimer’s is “an old people’s thing”. I’m not old. Why do I care about it? And that’s the fundamental problem. And that’s the problem with a lot of different things. Diseases like cancer are much more relatable to people because people my age can get cancer. So it’s a worry in our minds. But Alzheimer’s, even early onset Alzheimer’s doesn’t necessarily come until we’re like 35 or 45. It’s not directly related to me right now, I don’t need to worry about it. Therefore, I don’t care about it. Nasim is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, to help high school and college students raise awareness and research money for Alzheimer’s.
June 22, 2016

Millennials for Change

I haven’t had a family member that’s been affected by Alzheimer’s, but I don’t want to have a family member affected by Alzheimer’s. I don’t want to have a friend, a colleague, or a friend of a friend. And I think we, as an organization, can educate people my age, who are going to be the ones that, 20 years from now, 10 years from now, are dealing with this in vast numbers. We are the ones that can establish that change and begin to make it and bring awareness to the cause. And that’s why I’ve developed, in the last month and a half, I’ve developed a huge passion and devotion to the organization. Nasim is a member of the Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, to help high school and college students raise awareness and research money for Alzheimer’s.
June 22, 2016

Autos for Alzheimer’s Car Show

Yesterday was our third annual, “Autos for Alzheimer’s”. It’s a classic car show, opened to all vehicles 1975 and older. We had about 150 cars and close to 2,000 spectators. I actually started this event three years ago, when my Grandma entered her final stage. I just wanted to do something in her memory and in her honor. If I could be half the person she is and how kind she was to people, then that would be pretty amazing. Though it’s too late to help her, you know, I can help future generations. And if I’m affected by it, or my sisters, or my mom, there will be a cure because I’m helping bring awareness. My name is Jennifer Kniesel and this is MyAlzheimers. Every year, Jennifer Kniesel and her family hold a car show and auction, to raise money for Alzheimer’s families.
February 4, 2016

Your Story Is All You Need to Be an Alzheimer’s Advocate

Advocacy should never be intimidating. And public policy should not be intimidating. And a lot of people say, “I don’t know anything about politics, I can’t do that. I can’t volunteer in that way.” And I would just like to encourage people that, politicians put their pants on the same way that we do. And, they are going to vote for the things their constituents tell them are important. So, we have an obligation, a duty to tell our legislators that Alzheimer’s is important. If it’s important to you, your legislator should know about it. And, as an American, if we don’t tell our legislators and our elected officials what’s important, they won’t vote on it. So, I really firmly believe that we all have a stake in this game. And that all of us can participate in some way or another, in public policy. And it’s really about your story. I said the other day, your story is all you need to be involved in Advocacy. It’s all you need. You don’t need to know about the bills, you don’t need to know about the process. All you need to do is tell your story and say we need to do something about this. Want to contact your local congressional leader? Click here.   Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

Why Alzheimer’s Needs to Be a National Priority

I think it needs to be a National priority because everyone that I meet, has been affected by this disease. So, if everyone is affected or knows someone affected, why isn’t it a national priority? I mean, it doesn’t make sense to me. And, you know the same kind of thing happened with Cancer. Everyone started to know someone or be personally affected by Cancer. And then our country started investing in it. And now, people are living with Cancer. They are cured from Cancer. And we can prevent many Cancers. So we need to follow that same path as we did with Cancer, because it’s affecting Americans in a big way. So it’s time for us to get to work, it’s time for us to make a change because if we don’t, it’s really looking scary in our future. And I don’t want to live in a world where everyone I know is facing Alzheimer’s disease. That’s really scary. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

The Young Professional Alzheimer’s Advocates of Michigan

We have a really outstanding group of young people in the state of Michigan. And actually, there’s young people in every state. But in Michigan, I think they’re particularly awesome. We have a group of Young Professional Alzheimer’s Advocates. They are established in Lansing and Washtenaw County, right now. And these are young people that have been personally affected by this disease. They are either dealing with this, day in and day out, as a professional, or they’ve lost a loved one, many grandparents or parents. Or they’re caring for a parent right now. So the young people are getting together, they’re doing things like “Happy Hours” to raise funds for Alzheimer’s disease or “bar crawls”. They’re really kind of creative fundraising mechanisms. They’re going to be doing a “Blondes v. Brunettes” type of flag football fundraiser. But in Michigan, it’s going to be called, “Rivals” because we’re going to be doing it from the University of Michigan v. Michigan State kind of perspective. So the Spartans playing the Wolverines, in the fight against Alzheimer’s. And it’s going to be really huge. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

The Cost of an Alzheimer’s Cure

Doing research, to find drugs and cures is expensive. And so, $350 million is huge. It brings us up to almost $1 billion, for NIH research in 2016. But it is not enough. Last year we passed a law called, “The Alzheimer’s Accountability Act”. And it created a professional judgement budget, where members of Congress would receive suggested budget from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers, to say what they need, to get this disease cured or treated, by the year 2025. And in their recommendation, we need $2 billion a year to get there. So, we’re almost half way there. But that’s not enough. So, it’s a huge victory and I want to celebrate that victory, by all means. But I also want us to recognize that there’s so much more to be done in this sphere of Alzheimer’s research. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act Explained

The “HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act” is one that I’m really excited about. The HOPE Act would require that everyone in Medicare, upon receiving the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, would receive care planning, from their physician or another health professional. It also requires that our centers for Medicaid and Medicare, do an outreach campaign to providers, to make sure they know about an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. And the third component of the bill is to make sure that that diagnosis gets in the electronic medical records. This could have such an impact. We know right now, that about half of the people with Alzheimer’s disease, receive a diagnosis. And that’s just not fair. So this could really help people to get the diagnosis that they need and then, to get the help that they need, to manage the disease. So, I’m really excited about the HOPE Act. I think we’re gaining momentum. And we have a lot of support from our members of Congress. I hope that we can get this up for a vote soon and get it implemented and get people what they need, now. That’s the biggest barrier right now is, we can debate about this bill forever, but it’s time to get it into action. We need it to work. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

Tweet Congress!

Tweeting at our members of Congress. You might not think that’s impactful, but it’s hugely powerful. And that’s one of the things our young advocates do periodically, is tweet at their member of Congress and say, “Hey! We’re at the Alzheimer’s walk, why don’t you come join us?” or “We need your support on this bill, please vote and remember my story that I told you when I saw you last, at the forum.” Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

How Public Policy Helps Millions of Alzheimer’s Families

The Alzheimer’s Association does a lot of programs that support caregivers. We do support groups and we do care consultation or care planning. So we meet with families, one-on-one and in small groups, to really help them walk through that disease. And that is huge, in that individual’s life. It makes a big difference. But it really is one person or one family. So over the course of a year, for instance, our Michigan chapters might be able to reach out to a couple thousand families. But we don’t have the capacity to reach everyone in need. And public policy is our opportunity to reach more people, to get people the help that they need, in a bigger scale. So, if were to pass the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act, for instance, it would require that everyone in Medicare, when they receive a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or Dementia, receive care planning, right in their doctor’s office. So, we’re going to reach so many more people. And at the end of the day, the Alzheimer’s Association, we want to help people with this disease. Whether it’s us or their physicians, we want people to get what they need, to face Alzheimer’s. So, public policy, if we were to pass the HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act, we could go from helping a few thousand people every year, to helping millions of people that are faced with this disease. The impact is so much greater when we use public policy and advocacy. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

The Alzheimer’s Forum in Washington, D.C.

The Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum is our annual visit to Capitol Hill, to Washington., D.C. And we gather as many voices as we can, to storm Capitol Hill, and tell them that Alzheimer’s is important, we need your help. That’s the biggest message that we talk about. And people come and share their personal stories. So we have individuals that either have the disease, they’re caregivers, they’ve lost someone from this disease, or maybe they work in the industry, in a long term care setting for instance. They come and they tell their personal stories to their legislators. And I am a professional in this field. I don’t have a personal story. And so I’m really good at giving the facts and talking about why this disease is important. But without the personal story, I’m not a 100% successful. And those personal stories really do change this disease. They really do change peoples’ opinion and inspire people to take action. So, getting more of those stories to legislators on Capitol Hill, is really what we need to make a difference. Last year we had almost 1,000 voices. A thousand of these stories, if you can imagine, going to their legislator and pouring their heart out, saying, “I lost my mom to this disease and I don’t want to lose anyone else.” It’s just incredibly powerful. And we need that on Capitol Hill. Again, I’ll reference some of the other diseases, like HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, Cancer – they bring out their armies. And we need to bring out our army of people to fight this disease. And so we need more voices to come and talk to our legislators. On the other, we need our legislators to be present and to be open to hearing from their constituents. Most of them really are and are really glad to hear from us, because it’s so important. And they understand that it’s important. You know, the biggest thing to remember is that all politics are local politics. They want to hear from their voters. So we need people from every district, from every state in the United States, to go to Washington and to do just that. Tell their story and ask for help from their member of Congress. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

Alzheimer’s Needs Millennials

It’s really unexpected to see young people fighting Alzheimer’s disease. It’s often and “old person’s disease”. And people don’t think that this disease affects young people. So, it gets their attention in a new way, especially legislators. So when a young person goes into a legislator’s office, they think they’re going to talk about things like college or student loans, maybe. And sometimes they do. But when they talk about Alzheimer’s disease, their ears perk up and they kind of, “wait, what? you’re talking about Alzheimer’s?” So that is a really great thing. And I would love to see more young people to get involved in this sphere because it’s going to affect us all. If it hasn’t affected you yet, it’s going to affect you in the future. And your parents could be the ones facing Alzheimer’s disease. And I think about, often, do I have the capacity to pay for long term care, for my parents? The answer is definitely “no”. And do I have the time? No, I have a baby to raise. I don’t have time. So I have a stake in this game, even though I don’t yet have a personal story. So, I really would encourage young people to get involved. Just start a young professional group in their own community. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

The Speed of the Leader Is the Speed of the Pack

It’s really important that we do a lot about Alzheimer’s. Alzheimer’s is such a multi-faceted disease and it affects caregivers, it affects young people, old people, people in the workplace. It has so many different things going on. And Congress, in my opinion, has the biggest opportunity to make a difference. They hold the purse strings for some of the biggest research; nationwide, worldwide. And so, if they were able to allocate more funding for Alzheimer’s disease, that could impact all those different sectors that I just referenced. So, if Congress makes the impact, I think it’s going to be an even bigger impact in many different ways. I think it will also inspire private sector and others to get more involved. But, I think the speed of the leader, is the speed of the pack. And our leader is our government, so that’s why Congress really needs to make a step and get us there. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
February 4, 2016

I Get to Help Millions of Alzheimer’s Families

I’ve always had a special place in my heart for working with older people. I think this is part of our society that really needs our help and I’ve also had a special place in my heart for doing public policy and advocacy. I’m a social worker by education, but what really excites me is when I can helps lots of people. Social work is about helping people. And when I do public policy and advocacy, I can help thousands of people and millions of people. It really amplifies one voice and makes such a big impact. Lindsay Brieschke is Director of Public Policy for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Chapters.
January 21, 2016

He’s Still My Dad

PART 5 OF 5 So, I was in the car. And I’m like, “let me call my Dad”. So he gets on the phone. And I’m like, “Hi Dad, it’s Jacqui.” “Hi!…Are you here?” I’m like, “no Dad, I’m in California. I’m just calling to see how you’re doing.” “Ok. Are you coming by?” I said, “No Dad, I’m in California. I just wanted to call and see how you’re doing.” “Ok. Who is this again?” I said, “Dad, it’s Jacqui. It’s your daughter.” “Are you here?” I could take all the years of knowledge, of not having my Father there. In and out of foster homes, never seeing my Dad. I could take, accepting that he abandoned me. But I couldn’t take him forgetting that I existed. That was the last conversation I had with my Dad. He died in February 2009. As a woman, even though I didn’t grow up with my Father, Men; your Dad; that Father figure…and it doesn’t matter if you replace him with every man you meet. You will never, a woman will never replace the relationship of her natural Father. There will always be that void. If you can resolve it, find peace with it. Make peace with it. I’m not Fatherless. When I reference my Father, he’s the one I reference. Even though my Dad didn’t raise me, he’s still my Dad. Jacqui’s Father has Alzheimer’s. In our new five part series, Jacqui talks about the importance of Fatherhood and Family. This is the last episode of this series. To meet Jacqui and start at the beginning, click here for Part I.
January 21, 2016

Daddy, Daughter Issues

PART 4 OF 5 If the two people on the planet, who are supposed to love you, nurture you, take care of you, support you, be there for you, you’re whole entire life – are not; how can you hold anyone else up to that standard? You can’t. So, it was just important for me to be able to reconcile with my parents and not blame them, for who I became. I didn’t blame them for who I became and I didn’t credit them for who I became. But at 42, I was single. I had just created a television show. I had bought my first home. And I was sitting in it, without a man. And I started to wonder, if my “Daddy / Daughter issues” were keeping me from finding the right relationship. So, I decided, I want to put this to bed. I want to spend time with my Father, to know who he was. To get to know the man that I didn’t know, and see if he was the man I thought he was. And I was still angry. I needed answers to questions, I wanted him to answer. So, I pick him up from the airport. He gets in my car. And the very first thing he says me when he gets in the car is: “I wanted to take you”. And so, I said: “Dad, it’s fine. It’s all in the past now. Let’s move forward from here. Let’s make new memories.” My Dad drank. And by one o’clock in the afternoon, I would say: “Don’t talk to my Dad after one, cuz he won’t remember anything you say, tomorrow.” What I didn’t know, was that my Dad was already latent Alzheimer’s. He had Alzheimer’s and I had no idea. And no one in his family knew. So, the man I was getting to know at 42, was a man who was stricken with Alzheimer’s and I had no idea. Jacqui’s Father has Alzheimer’s. In our new five part series, Jacqui talks about the importance of Fatherhood and Family. Click here for the final episode in this series. And if you didn’t see our intro piece to Jacqui, click here for Part I.
January 21, 2016

Dinner with Daddy

PART 3 OF 5 I wanted my brother to meet my Father. Now at this point, I lived in California. I had custody of my little brother. He was like 12 years old and he had never seen his Dad since he was, like three. My brother lit up like a balloon when he met his Father. And my Dad wanted to take us to dinner. The next day comes. My brother’s excited. “We’re going to dinner with Daddy! My Dad’s taking me to dinner, tonight!” So we’re ready. We’re ready at the house, at 7:30pm. No Dad. 8:00pm. No Dad. 9:00pm. No Dad. No phone call. The next day my Dad calls. And he says: “I’m really sorry I couldn’t come last night.” He said, “Katie wouldn’t let me come.” Katie is my Father’s wife, of 50-something years, who is not happy that I exist, or my brother. I can only imagine what it’s like for a woman to be married for 50 years, to a man and he have a 12 year affair, that you can’t control; that won’t end. And there’s children in that affair. I can only imagine what her life was like. And so I left. And that was the last time my brother saw my Father because my brother died, two years later, of an asthma attack. Jacqui’s Father has Alzheimer’s. In our new five part series, Jacqui talks about the importance of Fatherhood and Family. Click here for the next episode in this series. And if you didn’t see our intro piece to Jacqui, click here for Part I.
January 21, 2016

Dad Was Always Happy to See Me

PART 2 OF 5 Every time I saw him, he was always happy to see me. My Dad had two jobs. One, he drove a delivery truck for newspapers, the Asbury Park Press. He drove for them and he had this delivery truck. My Dad would show up at the house, 1:30 in the morning and he would pick me and my Mom up. This was every day, Monday through Friday. He’s pick us up and put me in the back of the truck, with the bundles of newspapers. And that’s where I’d go back to sleep. And he’d make his deliveries, she’d be in the front with him. And I’d be in the back of the truck, with the bundles of newspapers. And it sounds crazy, but that was one of the best times of my life. It was fun, it was whacky, crazy. I’d roll around in the back with the newspapers, and then, you know, his deliveries were usually done about 4:30 in the morning or five. And he’d take us back home and that was one of my first memories with my Father. I was a victim of child abuse. My Mom was very abusive to me. And, I love her to death, but she was sick. You know, you can’t control yourself when you’re schizophrenic. And then when you add alcohol on top of it, it doesn’t make it a very good situation. So, I was a victim of that. And I fought so hard, so many times, to live; to just live, that I had to make something of my life. And yes, you know, other kids in that situation turned to drugs, turned to alcohol, killed themselves. I fought so hard to live, that those things weren’t options for me. I landed in a home in New Jersey. And it wasn’t the perfect house, you know. It wasn’t the perfect situation. But it was a loving family and I just decided, I just decided mentally, that this is where I’m going to stay until I graduate from high school. I wanted to only be in one high school. I was in the marching band, I played four instruments, I was in the drama club, I was on the speech and debate team, I played basketball, I was a starter freshmen in the softball team, pitcher – I was in everything. I was in the “Debutante Ball”. I was 17, about to graduate high school and I asked my Father if he would escort me in the ball. He told me he couldn’t because his wife wouldn’t let him. And it would, I guess put on display, our relationship. So my foster dad escorted me in the ball. Jacqui’s Father has Alzheimer’s. In our new five part series, Jacqui talks about the importance of Fatherhood and Family. Click here for Part III. And if you didn’t see our intro piece to Jacqui, click here for Part I.
January 21, 2016

Meet Jacqui

PART 1 OF 5 My Father was one of the funniest, playful, most jovial people I knew. And that’s who I am. I laugh and I smile at everything. I have a good time in life and that was my dad. I was born a love child. So, my dad and my mom were never married. He was married to another woman and he had an affair for 12 years, with my mother. I was the first child to come out of that union. There were two of us. One was eleven years after me. I didn’t have a home. I didn’t have a home base. I was a foster kid. I was a foster kid since I was seven years old. Foster care is a savior system and it’s horrifying to child, at the same time, especially if you know your family. It’s one thing if you were born an infant and are plopped into a family that you don’t know, they become your family and that’s all you know. But if you have memories of who your family is and who your family members were and all of a sudden you are sitting in the living room with someone you don’t know, it’s frightening. Jacqui’s Father has Alzheimer’s. In our new five part series, Jacqui talks about the importance of Fatherhood and Family. Click here for Part II
December 3, 2015

Walk to End Alzheimers: East LA

I think it’s under-reported, under-diagnosed in these communities and that’s probably the bigger issue. By the time a family finally gets to the doctor and gets a diagnosis, they’ve been living with the disease for seven years and actually most of them are in the middle stages. One of the biggest challenges with Alzheimer’s is the fact that people don’t speak enough about the disease, they generally keep it quiet, given that it’s a very sensitive, very personal topic. I think it’s so important, especially for the Latino community, to their stories and experiences because there’s a lot of misinformation. They think this is a “white person’s disease”. I think it’s very important because it does let people know, like “wow, I’m not the only one, there’s other families out there. There’s other people like me caregiving for my mom, my dad”. The more that we talk about it, the better it’s going to be for families that feel like they’re on their own, that there isn’t anything out there for them. And there is. This is orange, to show you’re a general supporter. But the yellow one is that you care for someone that has the disease. And there’s so many yellow ones, it was amazing to see.  And so what we need to do is really just speak up and to let others know this is a serious issue that needs to be addressed, not only at the family level, but at a society level. My name is Gabe. My name is Alicia. My name is Sal de Los Angeles. Hola, mi nombre es Margarita Gomez e esta MyAlzheimers. On October 24, 2015, MyAlzheimers captured stories from the very first Alzheimer’s Walk in East LA.
November 30, 2015

Dad Was a Fighter

“He fought until the very end, you know. When we tried to take the keys away, he fought us on that. And that was a tough conversation, because he had driven all over the world. He’d driven around and he had taken me to countless practices and places and he took me to college; dropped me off. And so I think that sense of fighting is what gets me out of bed every morning, to fight against this disease, to come out here and organize a team to fundraise.” Gabe’s Father died from Alzheimer’s. He’s now a relentless advocate.
November 23, 2015

Alzheimer’s and the Hispanic Community

Personally, I like to imagine that I’m going to be a very active person when I get older. But, I’m Hispanic and I think that my chances of developing this disease are actually much higher than average. And so I have to re-imagine my life and what that future could hold for me. After his Grandfather’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis, Edwin became a relentless advocate.
November 23, 2015

Why I Volunteer to End Alzheimer’s

My Grandfather is currently living with Alzheimer’s right now. I have, on my mom’s side, she has nine brothers and sisters, all of which are trying to share time and take care of him. Something that I learned during this process, is that they’re not able to move him around as much because it hurts with the familiarity of his space and stuff like that. Because obviously he’s got loss of memory and everything going on. It’s been really difficult to hear the stories my family has, like my aunts, my mom especially, like having to share this experience of not being able to control the situation and trying to figure everything out. Luckily, I volunteered for the Alzheimer’s Association for five years and the South Florida chapter and I was able to tell them to please contact them and they’ve been able to help them a lot. After his Grandfather’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis, Edwin became a relentless advocate.
November 16, 2015

The Worst Kind of Death

I was touched by death a few times, early in my life, so I’d always thought about it a great deal. But this kind of presented something for the first time, that was a little bit worse than death, you know what I mean? It kind of showed me a way that someone can almost start to die, in a sense, without actually dying. And, god I just think that’s so much worse, you know? As far as that changing my own philosophy, I don’t know how much it really has. It definitely brought me to a place where, you just want people to take care of people, you know? You just really want people to take care of people and stop hiding behind things, like fear of death and fear of what it might be and just really accept it and start, you know, taking it head on. It’s not something to ignore and deal with the feelings once it hits you in the face. You know, to hide from if it’s not in your family. It’s something for you to hear about and to take action on it right now, because you never know. There’s no way to tell who is going to be affected right now. Mark ‘s family has been touched by Alzheimer’s and he’s a relentless advocate.
November 14, 2015

Advice for Millennials

You know, be innovative. And do things that are not expected of them and stop trying to live up to expectations and think certain things are supposed to fall in place, no matter what. Live life by the seat of your pants and just go for it. And, you know, you’re gonna fail, you might succeed, but you’re going to fail more that you’re going to succeed and just try again. Ryan is the Primary Caregiver for his 93 year old Grandmother, who is living with Alzheimer’s.
November 14, 2015

Alzheimer’s Makes Me Live in the Moment

“I mean, it’s changed me in a lot of ways. You know, it’s changed my career path. Before I didn’t really know what I was going to do. Now I’m going into Alzheimer’s research, myself. In terms of the way I live my life, it’s completely different. I had planned on staying in Colorado my entire life and staying with my family and doing whatever, but then it was kind of like, this is the only time you have. Why not do all those things that you have inklings of doing? What if I could do this? You can do that, why shouldn’t you – just go do that. If you have a problem with your life, you should change it. So, I guess that’s kind of how it’s impacted me. I made the move to California because I’m interested in wine, I want to go see how that’s made. Oh, I think I’ll do research now. Cool, I’ll make that happen for myself. It’s a huge driving factor for me. Do what you want to do.” Kacey’s Grandmother has Alzheimer’s.
November 10, 2015

Carpe Kilimanjaro: An Alzheimer’s Story

In 2005 my father-in-law descended into the crater, on the summit of Kilimanjaro. My own father began descent into an even greater unknown. Each path, very different. One chosen. The other compelled by the cruel hand of Alzheimer’s. One, a beginning. The other, an end. Like my father, the snows are disappearing and the mountain is showing signs of age. And for those of us living in the shadows of the glacier and dealing with the ravages of age, we are only concerned with making the most of the time before they are both gone forever. Outwardly invincible, mountains and men fade and disappear over time. Carpe Kilimanjaro is a feature documentary and story of Zach Jordan’s literal ascension of a mountain and his metaphorical ascension to fatherhood, in the face of his father’s Alzheimer’s diagnosis.
November 10, 2015

Tell Your Alzheimer’s Story

Tell the story. And the reason I say that is because I raised money last year, for the “Walk to End Alzheimer’s” in LA. I kept getting donations, I put some stuff on Facebook or Twitter, stuff like that. And then told my story on the website. Everyone that donated, I just got emotional because I thought, “why are they doing this? why are my peers, who are young professionals who don’t have a lot of money, why are they giving me $50 – why are they giving me $100, why are they giving me $25?” And I was just really moved by that and then I asked one of my friends and she’s like, “you are telling your story and people are reacting to the story. They’re not reacting to you saying, ‘can I have money.’ They’re saying, ‘here’s what happened to me, has it happened to you?’ Let’s do something about it.” And I think, that just woke me up a little bit, like, just keep talking about what you know. And what I know is the story that has affected my life and changed my family, forever. Matt’s Grandfather died from Alzheimer’s.
November 10, 2015

The Long Alzheimer’s Journey

I think, there’s a variety of things. One, to sort of realize the scope of the problem and how this is going to impact so many folks. As people live longer, it’s going to impact more and more people, as time goes on, across the 21st century. Additionally, someone like my mother, diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s, she was…2005, so she would have been 54 years old when she was diagnosed. So early-onset’s a minority of the people impacted by the disease, but it’s a significant minority and it shows you how a lot of folks are really not that old, who get diagnosed with this disease. And then I guess the third thing I would say is just the toll that Alzheimer’s takes on the family and especially the spouse, for the caregiving and dealing with the situation and continuing to love the person, but also care for them as they’re losing their personality. It’s an extremely difficult thing to go through. Everyone who has someone who is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s has to go through that experience and that’s a big part of it. David’s Mother Died from Alzheimer’s.
November 10, 2015

Alzheimer’s Fundraising

“My advice for people that feel that, they have a family member they truly care about and they were affected by this disease, don’t think that you’re too young or you don’t have business experience, or you don’t know what you’re going to do. Just get out there and do something. I was 20 when I started all these (Autos for Alzheimer’s) and I’m 23 now and it’s growing to be one of the biggest car shows that our area has, so just do something. I mean, the first year, yeah, I was disappointed in the outcome and the results and I thought there was going to be far more cars. But my advice to young people is, you know, do something. Do bake sales to raise money, it doesn’t have to be a lot. You don’t have to be raising thousands of dollars, every little bit helps. I just encourage people to get out there and try stuff. Hold car washes, you know, just anything to raise awareness because there isn’t enough awareness. And it’s not just a disease now that’s affecting elderly, it’s affecting people in their 30’s. My Grandma started to get it when she was in her late 40’s. So, it’s not just elderly people. And even if it were, elderly people; they are our history, they are important. Just because they are old, doesn’t mean you get to discard them. They’re just as important as someone that’s battling breast cancer, in their 30’s. So I just encourage people to get out and do school fundraisers or anything they can do to make a difference.” Jennifer’s Grandma has Alzheimer’s. To honor her and raise money for other families who are affected by Alzheimer’s, Jennifer started the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event, in 2013.
November 10, 2015

Alzheimer’s and My Sisters

Rachael’s Grandmother has Alzheimer’s. Every year, her family holds the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event.
November 10, 2015

Alzheimer’s: Not a Physical Pain

Meet Marilyn White. She’s a former Olympic runner, singer, poet, and mother. She is also living with Alzheimer’s.
November 10, 2015

Message for Millennials: Use Your Voice

Kacey’s Grandmother has Alzheimer’s
November 10, 2015

Why Millennials Need to Care More About Alzheimer’s

“I was reading an article this morning about how Millennials get such a bad rap, about how we’re the ‘Benjamin Franklin generation’, because we have this new power to kind of reach a lot of people in a very different way. And I think, with that power, we can spread the word like wild fire. I think movies like ‘Still Alice’, movies like that need to keep being made. I think that all these different nuances of what Alzheimer’s can do to a family, need to be shared, so that people will realize that, you know, it’ really doesn’t just affect the old person. And sometimes it’s not even an old person, it’s early onset Alzheimer’s, like in the case I was speaking about. I think that, with things like that, we can reach a larger audience quicker and that people will realize it’s not just about the person going through Alzheimer’s, it’s about everyone around them. I don’t think that, people especially my age, if they haven’t dealt with it at all, they have no idea what it does to a family. And how much a family has to stop and how hard it is to find certain care facilities. It’s tough and I think if people really got a glimpse into other millennials lives, who have been affected by this disease, they would care more.” Mark’s family has been touched by Alzheimer’s and he’s a relentless advocate.
November 10, 2015

Life with My Alzheimer’s Family

Kelly’s Great Grandmother, Grandmother, and Uncle have all died from Alzheimer’s.
November 10, 2015

Don’t Be Afraid to Talk About Death

Kelly’s Great Grandmother, Grandmother, and Uncle have all died from Alzheimer’s.
November 9, 2015

Love Your Parents

Matt’s Grandfather died from Alzheimer’s.
November 9, 2015

Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Matt’s Grandfather died from Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

How This Experience Impacts My View on Aging

David’s Mother Died from Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Millennials and Alzheimer’s

Stacy’s Grandfather died from Alzheimer’s. She’s also a relentless Advocate for Alzheimer’s Association.
November 8, 2015

The Autos for Alzheimer’s Mission

Jennifer’s Grandma has Alzheimer’s. To honor her and raise money for other families who are affected by Alzheimer’s, Jennifer started the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event, in 2013.
November 8, 2015

Friday Nights with Grandma

Jennifer’s Grandma has Alzheimer’s. To honor her and raise money for other families who are affected by Alzheimer’s, Jennifer started the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event, in 2013.
November 8, 2015

I Think the Memories Are Still in There…Somewhere

Rick’s Mother-in-Law Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Autos for Alzheimer’s Car Show

Rick’s Mother-in-Law Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

My Mom Was My Best Friend

Tracy’s Mother Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Early Symptoms

Tracy’s Mother Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

You Can’t Fix This One, Dad

Tracy’s Mother Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

The Financial Impact of Alzheimer’s

Tracy’s Mother Kathy has Alzheimer’s. The Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event is held every year, in honor of Kathy and to raise money for families dealing with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Signs of Early Alzheimer’s

Makayla’s Grandma has Alzheimer’s. Every year, her family holds the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s: You Can’t Fix This

Makayla’s Grandma has Alzheimer’s. Every year, her family holds the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event.
November 8, 2015

Something Is Wrong with Grandma

Rachael’s Grandmother has Alzheimer’s. Every year, her family holds the Autos for Alzheimer’s fundraising event.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Symptoms

Tom’s Mother died from Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Mom, I Really Miss The Way You Were

Tom’s Mother died from Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Nursing Home Ratings

Linda’s Best Friend died from Alzheimer’s. Now she helps other Caregivers and supports causes like Autos for Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s and Your Children

Christy’s Father-in-Law is living with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Autos for Alzheimer’s: The Beginning

Cyndee’s best friend has Alzheimer’s. She’s also a relentless supporter of Autos for Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Give Alzheimer’s A Face

Bridget’s Aunt has been living with Alzheimer’s for nearly 10 years.
November 8, 2015

When Multiple Family Members Have Alzheimer’s

Lauren has been a loyal Caregiver and an Alzheimer’s Association Advocate for many years.
November 8, 2015

Share Your Alzheimer’s Story

Lola is a participant in the Los Angeles “Blondes v. Brunettes” charity touch football game, that raises money for the Alzheimer’s Association.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Association

“The difference between Alzheimer’s and say, Cancer is that, when someone has Cancer they’re still there. Their mind is there, they’re still able to communicate with people and with Alzheimer’s, they’re just gone. So, if you’re never had that experience, you just don’t understand it. You can’t understand how awful it is to watch somebody just disappear in front of your eyes. And if you did, if you had had that experience, there would be no question, there would be a cure for Alzheimer’s today. So, I would just say, put yourself in the shoes of people like me, who watched my dad die for eight years and now I’m left with this; volunteering to help other people so they don’t go through this as well. So, I’m doing my part. You should do your part too.” Glennis lost her father to Alzheimer’s. She’s not only a Survivor, but a relentless Advocate.
November 8, 2015

Mr. President, Stop Hiding from Alzheimer’s

Matt lost his father-in-law to Alzheimer’s disease.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Stigma

Meet Marilyn White. She’s a former Olympic runner, singer, poet, and mother. She is also living with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

I Forgot the Words to the Song…

Meet Marilyn White. She’s a former Olympic runner, singer, poet, and mother. She is also living with Alzheimer’s.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s: Not Just for Old People

Mel Schwimmer is a primary caregiver for his wife Barbara, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. Barbara and Mel have been married for 54 years.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s May Bankrupt the U.S.

Mel Schwimmer is a primary caregiver for his wife Barbara, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. Barbara and Mel have been married for 54 years.
November 7, 2015

Talk About Alzheimer’s!

Mel Schwimmer is a primary caregiver for his wife Barbara, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. Barbara and Mel have been married for 54 years.
November 7, 2015

Economic Impact of Alzheimer’s

Mel Schwimmer is a primary caregiver for his wife Barbara, who was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s. Barbara and Mel have been married for 54 years.
November 7, 2015

Alzheimer’s Myths

Elizabeth is the primary caregiver to her husband, Bill, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 60.
November 7, 2015

Alzheimer’s Funding

Elizabeth is the primary caregiver to her husband, Bill, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 60.
November 7, 2015

Alzheimer’s Awareness

Gary was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in December 2012, at the age of 63. Gary and his wife Lisa founded AlzAcrossAmerica, a non-profit dedicated to helping baby boomers who are affected by Alzheimer’s.
November 7, 2015

Early Onset Symptoms

Gary was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in December 2012, at the age of 63. Gary and his wife Lisa founded AlzAcrossAmerica, a non-profit dedicated to helping baby boomers who are affected by Alzheimer’s.
November 7, 2015

An Alzheimer’s Message for POTUS

The Young Professionals Committee, of the Alzheimer’s Association, Southland Chapter have a very important message for President Obama.
April 17, 2015

Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Gary was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in December 2012, at the age of 63. Gary and his wife Lisa founded AlzAcrossAmerica, a non-profit dedicated to helping baby boomers who are affected by Alzheimer’s.
April 16, 2015

Early Onset Alzheimer’s

A former real estate attorney, Gary was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s in December 2012, at the age of 63. He and his wife Lisa started a non-profit to help raise awareness for Alzheimer’s.

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