ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH

Alzheimer’s disease is the most expensive disease in America and the most underfunded. The disease is very complicated and the science of Alzheimer’s research changes constantly. Every Alzheimer’s event, fundraiser, or walk you participate in, ultimately affects how much money is allocated to Alzheimer’s research and the people you see in these videos. Simply put: passion and money are the key to a cure.

On this page, we’ll introduce you to the best and brightest minds from around the world. We want to to shine a light on all of the brilliant scientists and researchers, in an effort to raise awareness and ignite your fundraising efforts. We want to help you understand the basics of the disease pathology, developments in treatment, and offer the latest information on clinical trials and cutting-edge research. It’s our hope that, by meeting some of the leading, Alzheimer’s researchers and medical doctors, you and your organization will be motivated to help raise more money for a cure. 

June 30, 2016

We Need More Geriatricians

Actually, the article that stood out the most to me, was one on gerontology and geriatric medicine, in general. It was kind of funny, it talked about how it’s a way to save money on medicare, but they’re still closing programs because they’re perceived as “not being that useful”. But before that, I hadn’t heard very much about geriatrics as a field. It was kind of just, like old people can fall into any range. But that’s definitely been the most striking thing is, wow, this is a whole field that needs people.   Kate is a member of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s, at UCLA.
June 22, 2016

The 50/50 Campaign for Alzheimer’s

In order to fund undergraduate research, we have started the “50/50 campaign”, which is raising $50,000, for 50 undergraduate scholarships, that will be distributed all across the nation, from schools like Stanford, Harvard, Northwestern, and of course; at our founding chapter, here at UCLA. We need to raise this money because more and more students, who are of our brightest minds, are really looking forward to those Summer scholarships. I think we can circumvent the issue of lower NIH funding, by inspiring these young people, to say “hey, Alzheimer’s is the future. Alzheimer’s research will be making an impact and YOU need to be working on this.” As of today, we have about 10 professors here at UCLA, both MDs and PhDs, who have written support for our cause and who have offered space in their labs, for our scholarship program. Our goal now, is to raise that $50,000. Anything you can do to help support our cause, means a lot, towards those undergraduate researchers and toward their futures. Nihal Satyadev and Jay Gopal, Co-Founders of The Youth Movement Against Alzheimer’s talk about their 50/50 campaign, to raise money for undergrad Alzheimer’s research.
November 10, 2015

Dementia with Lewy Bodies

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders
November 10, 2015

Alzheimer’s and Genetics

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders
November 10, 2015

Why Women Are More Affected by Alzheimer’s

“I don’t think we have a great answer yet. There’s some hypothesis. So, we know that women live longer than men, so some of the thought is, ‘well, by living longer than we have, there’s an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease’. Age is the biggest risk factor for developing Alzheimer’s disease, so there’s a little bit of that component. But, there’s something else that’s more than just age. So for example, with women, we’ve heard recently that women might decline a bit faster. Does that have to do with our Apolipoprotein E4 allele that we just talked about? Does that change how we progress, in terms of the symptoms? Is there something that’s playing a role that’s related to hormones? So we know that in prior research studies with hormones, that the estrogen might be protective, then when women hit menopause that might change the protective factor. The bottom line is, we’re not sure. But there are some ideas about it.” Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 10, 2015

Why Are You So Interested in the Human Brain?

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

What Is the Difference Between Dementia and Alzheimer’s?

“I think people have a hard time distinguishing and it’s because Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of Dementia. So just to start of, Dementia means that you have a cognitive, usually memory problems or something of the like. That makes it difficult for you to live independently. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of Dementia, so people usually equate the two. But there are other kinds of Dementia, such as Lewy Body disease, Vascular Dementia, and so on.”   Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

What Is Alzheimer’s?

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Is Not a Normal Part of Aging

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Causes

“We know that there are these abnormal proteins that build up, so amyloid beta and tau builds up in the brain of people who have Alzheimer’s disease. But we’re not sure if that’s the cause of it, or is it a byproduct? There are some other hypothesis that there’s some inflammation that sets off this cascade. But we don’t really know and that’s the bottom line. We don’t know what’s causing it, so we can’t say for sure, how to prevent and how to fix it. But because we know these amyloid proteins and tau proteins build up, then thought is maybe if we can get rid of these proteins, we can help the disease. And that’s where the targets are for a lot of research and clinical trials.” Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Alzheimer’s Stages

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

What is the Alzheimer’s Symptoms Test?

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Early Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

What Alzheimer’s Research Are You Most Excited About and Why?

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Why Is There a Lack of Alzheimer’s Funding?

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

The Difference Between an Alzheimer’s Study and a Clinical Trial

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Why It’s Important to Volunteer for Clinical Trials

Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

How Do I Find Clinical Trials?

“If you’re affiliated with the Alzheimer’s organization, that’s a great non-profit organization that has chapters all across the country and they can provide education and have people sign up, who are willing to participate. The National Institute on Aging also has websites where you can look for current research in your area. You can contact your local doctor and see if they’re affiliated with other academic institution or private companies, who might know of research. I would say do a quick Google search and you might find a lot in your area, or contact me.” Sharon J. Sha, MD, MS is part of the team at the Stanford Center for Memory Disorders.
November 8, 2015

Clinical Trials and Alzheimer’s Research

Jerry’s Mother died from Alzheimer’s. He’s an avid supporter of Autos for Alzheimer’s.
November 7, 2015

Test for Alzheimer’s

Elizabeth is the primary caregiver to her husband, Bill, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 60.
November 7, 2015

Alzheimer’s Test #2: Would You Want to Know?

Elizabeth is the primary caregiver to her husband, Bill, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at age 60.
November 7, 2015

Alzheimer’s Test: Would You Want to Know?

Gary was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in December 2012, at the age of 63. Gary and his wife Lisa founded AlzAcrossAmerica, a non-profit dedicated to helping baby boomers who are affected by Alzheimer’s.

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